Virtual Reality Film

Virtual Reality means computer-generated imagery (CGI) convincingly immersing the user with the atmosphere. A film does what a video game cannot do at this point: believable characters. A film can take live, real-world footage, and combine it with CGI to create a believable world of fictitious content.

Virtual Reality has come a long way, and Occulus Rift is showing some serious promise for gamers, among a multitude of other genre’s. But what if a film can be created that is meant to be viewed from a the occulus rift viewpoint? What if the well-funded film, a blockbuster in it’s own right, can be viewed from an observer that is able to 3-dimensional track his position in the film world? It would be like a person who the rest of the world does not acknowledge, a ghost for simplistic terminology. And what if more then one person could experience the film world simultaneously. Think of it: two people don the iconic Occulus masks, and they engage a movie, and it’s been filmed it 3d.

But in Occulus Rift, the viewing apparatus actually tracks head movement, and movement in a room that is tracking the device. The view would experience the film world in real time, and even be able to see his friend experience it with him. Of course, it would only allow movement based on the size of the viewing room, with Occulus Rift gear wires and tracking sensors detecting viewer movements. But compare this to movie viewing at present. A movie is played on a 2d screen, and views sit still and watch it. And if it’s an action film, the viewers get up with a sense of peculiar energy. The larger-then-life characters in the story were so limber and agile, while the viewer is getting comfortable walking again. Virtual Reality film could mean viewers could participate in some of the same physical intensity of the characters and atmosphere they are being immersed in.